The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Latest

1 Feb 2023     Glen Kalem
The Prophet of War (part II)

By Glen Kalem-Habib  © all rights reserved copyright 2023 Almost a decade ago, I wrote about a newly discovered publication I found of The Prophet which I had purchased for our collections, whose relatively unknown history, was surprisingly linked to World War II. The article entitled The Prophet of War spoke of a small paperback edition of The Prophet that was not for “public sale” but was a complete copy, no larger than your average smartphone. The book came about via a joint initiative between the US government, and the newly formed not-for-profit  Council on Books in Wartime, which published pre-chosen titles under the - Armed Services Inc.   The result was the birth of the ...

4 Jan 2023     Glen Kalem
Translating Gibran’s Early Arabic Books: An Unpublished Letter of Mikhail Naimy to Alfred Knopf

by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem-Habib American publisher Alfred Abraham Knopf (1892-1984) along with his wife Blanche Wolf (1894-1966), both born to a Jewish family, founded Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. in New York City in 1915. The publishing house, which would bring out the best of North and Latin American, European, and Russian literature, soon became famous all over the world for its special attention to the quality of content, presentation, printing, binding, and design in his books.

3 Nov 2022     Glen Kalem
The House of The Prophet: Gibran at Mrs. Garland’s Farm

by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem-Habib Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet was not written in some faraway mysterious land, as one might assume from reading it. Almustafa, Almitra, and the people of Orphalese did not emanate to life in some lonely hermitage on the top of a mountain, but – unbelievable as it may seem – in a bustling and sometimes "lively and festive” estate in the countryside of Massachusetts, USA.

13 Nov 2022     Glen Kalem
Why I Wrote ‘Jesus the Son of Man’: A Little-Known Interview with Gibran

by Francesco Medici Kahlil Gibran wrote his longest book, Jesus the Son of Man: His Words and His Deeds as Told and Recorded by Those Who Knew Him, in a little over a year between 1926 and 1927 and New York publisher Alfred Knopf published it in the fall of 1928. Actually, the figure of Jesus had already appeared in Gibran’s writings and art in various forms. He also often told his patroness Mary Haskell that he had recurring dreams of him and mentioned wanting to write a life of Jesus in a 1909 letter to her.

16 Oct 2022     Glen Kalem
With Kahlil Gibran at the Tenth Street Studio Building - "if walls could talk"

By Glen Kalem-Habib and Francesco Medici  all rights reserved copyright 2022 © When Kahlil Gibran died on April 10, 1931, he had been living for almost twenty years in a one-room studio apartment on the third story of 51 West Tenth Street, NYC. During the latter part of his life, he’d often refer to his studio as ‘The Hermitage’ (al-Sawma‘ah, in Arabic), perhaps wanting to invoke feelings of solitude and refuge away from the sprawling city of New York.

1 Feb 2023     Glen Kalem
The Prophet of War (part II)

By Glen Kalem-Habib  © all rights reserved copyright 2023 Almost a decade ago, I wrote about a newly discovered publication I found of The Prophet which I had purchased for our collections, whose relatively unknown history, was surprisingly linked to World War II. The article entitled The Prophet of War spoke of a small paperback edition of The Prophet that was not for “public sale” but was a complete copy, no larger than your average smartphone. The book came about via a joint initiative between the US government, and the newly formed not-for-profit  Council on Books in Wartime, which published pre-chosen titles under the - Armed Services Inc.   The result was the birth of the ...